Tuesday, August 26, 2008

So ... what would you like to see in our magazines?

As editors, we often get so boxed in to what we think we know that you want to read, that sometimes we miss what you REALLY want to see and read. So what is it that we could run in Dental Economics, Dental Office, or Proofs that would be of interest to you? I'm sure that Mark Hartley and RDH would be interested to hear your thoughts as well.

Drop us a line on the PennWell community site and let us, the editors, know what we're doing right and what we're doing wrong. We're all ears.

15 comments:

sarapardh said...

I personally think what is missing in most dental hygiene magazines/journals is a humorous column based on the Dear Abby series regarding dental hygiene issues. I mean we all take our profession so seriously that we fortet how interesting and fun it can be at times. My personal opinion is that we are tired of the constant RDH,MS and RDH,Phd articles and research studies. It would be fun to include a column from a dental hygienist in the trenches. One who constantly faces some of the "sometimes comical" issues in dental hygiene. Like, what to do when a patient feels the need to point out that #7 is a crown and please don't dislodge it." I always bite back a retort of if I can remove it during a routine cleaning it wasn't cemented on right in the first place. Or my personal favorite is what to do when a patient acts offended if after 7 to 10 years of dental neglect and you are diligently trying to remove the stubborn lower anterior calculus in a 40 minute time frame your boss imposes and the patient feels offended when said piece of calculus touches their tongue. I think as with our grip on our instruments sometimes we need to "lighten up and laugh" because otherwise we may cry at the end of the day. Please consider me for this column and contact me if you are interested in some tasteful but humorous looks at our profession in your magazine. I personally think it would go a long way.

Sara Reich, BS (blah,blah,blah)
greich108@comcast.net

Darrell said...

What would I like to see published on paper? Honesty about HIPAA.

That would be an unprecedented exclusive in the dental publication industry.

So what are you waiting for? Darrell K. Pruitt DDS

kath said...

I'd love to see an article about the Dental Specialty Store in Northampton called White2th, formally Tooth Pix. The owner is an hygienist who's worked w/ so many patients w/ periodontal issues but was not finding the products she knew existed. Evelyn Perreault opened the store 6 years ago and every single customer LOVES THAT WE EXIST. We carry a full line of detergent, mint, fluoride and fluoride-free toothpastes, extra-soft tbrushes, alcohol free mouthrinses, a ton of nightguards for bruxism, healing and soothing products for those who have had surgery or for those w/ dry mouths due to medicine such as oncology patients, again products that patients won't see @ the local drug store. We also educate customers (at our Smile Bar) that a healthy mouth is a healthy body. Twice a year, we hold continuing ed classes for hygienist. The store is truly beneficial. Let's face it, people spend money on facials, manicures and pedicures, but yet our teeth and gums ARE SO IMPORTANT to our overall health. Unfortunately we feel like White2th is the best kept secret. Visit our website. You'll love it: white2th.com. I'm Kath, a friend of Ev's for 14 years and just want to see her succeed 'cuz she's a beautiful person inside and out! store phone number (413) 587-0359

GB said...

this one goes out to Dr. Joe Blaes, I think a feature cover of the Madow brothers would be great. what a shame they have not graced the cover of Dental Economics before. hope to see them on the cover soon

Rebecca said...

I agree with Sara and would welcome the opportunity to write for a column where dental hygienist can go to "talk it out"!
The stresses of this profession are immense and varied.
I already have commentary in written form, just waiting to be published!!
Rebecca Claunch RDH
rclaunch@aol.com

Madalyn Rosenbluth, RDH said...

There are so many personal stories out there!
We all have a need to hear other professionals tell "their story" of sucess along with the failures, wisdom earned and learned and the hope we can gain through sharing it with each other.
Intriguing personal stories reel us in, we can learn, identify, have empathy and compassion for fellow clinicians.
I know that I love hearing these marvelous stories and by sharing thru many articles and blogs I have gotten back many emails of support and inspiration.
Madalyn Rosenbluth, RDH
Madultrasonics@yahoo.com
www.madultrasonics.com

Madalyn Rosenbluth, RDH said...

There are so many personal stories out there!
We all have a need to hear other professionals tell "their story" of sucess along with the failures, wisdom earned and learned and the hope we can gain through sharing it with each other.
Intriguing personal stories reel us in, we can learn, identify, have empathy and compassion for fellow clinicians.
I know that I love hearing these marvelous stories and by sharing thru many articles and blogs I have gotten back many emails of support and inspiration.
Madalyn Rosenbluth, RDH
Madultrasonics@yahoo.com
www.madultrasonics.com

Madalyn Rosenbluth, RDH said...

There are so many personal stories out there!
We all have a need to hear other professionals tell "their story" of sucess along with the failures, wisdom earned and learned and the hope we can gain through sharing it with each other.
Intriguing personal stories reel us in, we can learn, identify, have empathy and compassion for fellow clinicians.
I know that I love hearing these marvelous stories and by sharing thru many articles and blogs I have gotten back many emails of support and inspiration.
Madalyn Rosenbluth, RDH
Madultrasonics@yahoo.com
www.madultrasonics.com

charlesr said...

Since the name is "Dental Economics" I would suggest articles that would help dentists avoid losing their hard earned dollars to "Permanent Lifetime Alimony." Statistically, dentists have a high divorce rate. Many states have a no-fault divorce law, which means one spouse can divorce the other for no reason. Usually the dentist is the income producing spouse. In many states, after 12 or more years of marriage, the income-producing spouse must pay the non-income producing spouse permanent alimony that stops only on the death of the payor or the death or remarriage of the payee. Since there is financial incentive not to remarry, it rarely happens. I never knew the scope of this problem until I experienced it. I would bet most dentists are not aware that this happens regularly to dentists. There are weekly suicides due to the hopelessness experienced with permanent alimony. With a 60% divorce rate in our country, the chances are many of your readers have gone through this or will go through this. There are organizations in almost every state to change these archaic laws. Please Get Involved! Email me for more information.

Niki said...

Did you know that Surgitel is distributing a "SurgiCam" but the camera is manufactured by VizVOCUS Technologies inc....
You can buy from them a VGA camera to mount on your loupes a much better price than the Surgitel's. This is the one Dr. Hollar is using.

VizVOCUS also has a new HD camera to mount onto your loupes....

Check it out at:
www.vizvocus.com

This is what I plan to buy.

sharon said...

Hi RDH/Mark
Would like to comment about conversation with Dr. Hwang and the discussion regarding the lack of access to preventive care.
Some of the reasons for lack of patient/client engagement in their own preventive care is the lack of ready access,cost and dental insurance.
Let me explain, the majority of oral health care is delivered in the traditional "cottage industry" style----a private dental practice who employes dental hygienist/s. More care would be accessed if non-traditional sites were available where dental hygiene services were directly available to the public. For instance in your last issue there is a dental hygienist who had opened up her own store to deliver oral health products and education directly to the public and was successful with this type of business and accepted by the public(see last month's issue).
I am sure you are aware that for the most part dental hygiene services are access through a very narrow keyhole---the private dental practice which is predicated upon where and when a dentist chooses to set up a dental practice. It is not based on community need, but on the financial wellbeing of the dental practitioner and this makes sense based on what it costs to set up a practice and the cost of a dental education. Neither is it based upon the pool of dental personnel in the area, but on economics for the practitioner. Therefore, choices for the patient/client are limited as well as the employment opportunities for the dental hygienist despite where a dental hygienist lives. There is a bottleneck and because of this (traditional think") a persistent model of current oral health care delivery continues to stifle public access and dental hygiene opportunities to serve the public.
The other issue which is vital to the future growth to our profession and the well being of our patient/clients is that of a lack of a voice at the dental insurance table. We are under represeted in this forum, our views on prevention are presented by dentists at the dental insurance purchasers table. The priorities for dental procedures and the coding that is implemented at these meetings is vital to setting the direction of oral health care. Many of the insurance providers are owned by dentists (ie Delta Dental),or are off shoots of state dental associations.
Dental hygienists need a voice at the table where these decisions are made regarding preventive services as well are at the state level where entry into dental hygiene practice and educational standards are being formulated.
Dental hygienists also need to step out of their comfort zones and "think outside the box" to improve the public's access and their opportunities to serve, work and make a living where and when they choose.

kath said...

Thx Sharon, and I hope it's our store that you're referring to in your comment - White2th, formerly Tooth Pix.

sharon said...

Yes, I was referring to White2th. I think it is a concept that should be expanded and replicated by dental hygienists everywhere.

Sharon

kath said...

Absolutely, and thanks Sharon, it is a great store, have you been? You'd love it! Thx again. Kath

John OliverC said...

I wholeheartedly agree with sarapardh and I would add that its important to see the sector from the clients' perpsective. Articles such as 'How to select a dentist' etc. kind of like how its done in this article CDC Guide to Hygene in Dental Offices albeit a little more catchy perhaps.

(disclosure - I do marketing for ABM and this is my opinion based on researching the blogosphere on the subject)